Jason C. Stanley

ponderings of a dad walking humbly & seeking justice

Tag: writing (page 1 of 2)

A Treat

The present was neatly wrapped

Ribbon red flowing down the side

Elegantly given and kept

A gift of love, grace, and of pride

The act that was so clearly apt.

Photo by DiEtte Henderson on Unsplash

Treat

evil lurked

source: New York Daily News

source: New York Daily News

evil lurked
quietly in the garden.
unseen. unheard. unknown.
as God breathed the breath of life into adamah,
evil slithered in the shadows.

the adamah
became humanity.
muscles, skin, and bones walking around
breathing; sighing; crying;
placed in the beauty of the garden.

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Light

the light pours into the dark room.

it illuminates only a small space.

but it is enough to cast away the darkness.

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I Have a Voice

God gave me a voice and said, “It is good.”
     But, I talk, and you carry on as if I’m not here.
     I speak and it is as if I’m not in the room.
As if I have nothing to say.

I have a voice.

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The Rum Diary (2011)

rum_diary_ver2_xlgPaul Kemp (Johnny Depp) is an American journalist who has relocated to San Juan, Puerto Rico as a freelance writer in the 1950s.   He’s hired by a not-so-great American newspaper to write the daily horoscopes.   At first he thinks it’s a joke, but alas, it is not.

As the film unfolds, there’s a tension in the air, and I don’t mean the rum-aroma air that almost seeps through the screen.  There is a tension existing inside Paul Kemp.  As he sits at Al’s bar with Chenault (Amber Heard) he tells her, “I don’t know how to write like me.”   From the beginning of the film, we see this struggle.  After witnessing his first Puerto Rican cock fight, Paul wanders off with a camera.  He snaps some pictures of the local children in a trash dump.  He then writes a story about the children eating in the dump.  He wants to draw the attention of the reader to this great injustice.  It’s rejected by the editor, Lotterman (Richard Jenkins).  “Nothing will change,” Lotterman reasons.  “You underestimate me,” Kemp replies.

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Quote: Writers Write

Gloria Gaither_Writers Write

Follow Friday: Susan Irene Fox

I first discovered Susan Irene Fox and her self-titled blog after she started liking some of mine posts. Out of curiosity I started reading her blog. Susan has a way of sharing profound, spiritual thoughts that are welcoming and not threatening. After a twenty-year career as an elementary school teacher, that ended due to a permanent disability, Susan started blogging to get her name out there.

She had started a Bible curriculum projected for grades K-6 called Branches. The blog was to give her an online fingerprint for potential publishers. Ever since then, both the curriculum and the blog have evolved. “The curriculum,” Susan says, “is now a biblical devotional series for families.”  Branches, which is based on John 5:14-15, is currently in the editing stage. Meanwhile, the blog has greatly expanded as “a way to edify, encourage, enrich – and sometimes gently exhort – the Body of Christ,” Susan says. The blog has become, for Susan, a way to abide in the Spirit, while building the Kingdom of God.

As I have lifted the focus off me and onto God, the experience has become rich with new insight. Followers have increased organically as the Spirit has led them. And when just one person tells me the words I write have reached his or her heart, that comment keeps me motivated for weeks, because I have been an obedient vessel.

At times, Susan will post a poem, which is an incredible way to express a gospel truth. “Poetry,” Susan says, “is a rekindled love.” She wrote poetry during high school and college. She would teach grammar through poetry writing. Often, as she writes in her personal prayer journal, she will write poems. She never, however, had the courage to make any of the poems public. With great delight, the poems were welcomed and well received. Susan got a number of reassurance and support for them, including from other poets. She now posts a poem every Sunday – “my small way of praising Him.”

Susan, like other bloggers, will occasionally do a series. Currently she is doing a series on the Beatitudes. Susan says there are two reasons that went into her decision to do a series. “The first,” she says, “is because writing a series keeps me motivated, interested, and educated.” It gives her the opportunity to “dive more deeply into a small amount of Scripture,” and then share what she gleaned from that dive with others. “The second reason,” she says, “is that, as I’m editing Branches, I’m relooking at this living text called the Bible.” Susan says that each time she ponders on the Bible, “it seems to speak differently” to her. These new ponderings lead her into areas she may not have been ready to see previously in her life. “It’s an adventure,” she says, “and I love to follow each new path.”

The topics in the series are the same topics that are included in Branches. The first series was on the Fruit of the Spirits. The series after the Beatitudes will be The Twenty Third Psalm. Each series gives an opportunity to chew and digest small pieces of Scripture at a time.

I was curious to know who Susan reads. Every so often she will quote a Christian thinker and ponderer. When Susan first came to faith, she “soaked up Lee Strobel’s books.” She names her pillars as N. T. Wright, Dallas Willard, Richard Foster and Henry and Richard Blackaby. She also reads Max Lucado, Tullian Tchividjian, Jonathan Merrit, Francis Chan, Phyllis Tickle, David Platt, John Ortberg, Beth Moore, and Tim Keller. But that is just to name a few.

Blogging has its rewards. I wanted to know what the most rewarding part of Susan was from blogging.

The most rewarding part of blogging is the discovery of new things about Scripture from the most amazing blog writers. I have so much to learn as a new believer, yet just this week I was greatly comforted and inspired that I am not unlike all those other “new believers” in the first century – Mary and Martha, Priscilla and Lydia, Titus and Timothy – and I am humbled and enriched to be in such gracious company.

You can read Susan’s blog at susanirenefox.com and you can follow her on Twitter @susanirenefox.

Strangely Warmed: A John Wesley Monologue

After searching for a monologue or skit for Aldersgate Day, I wrote out the following.

Strangely Warmed

A John Wesley Monologue

I was in despair. I felt like I was losing my faith and did not think that I should continue to preach. I was finding very little comfort in religion.  I confessed these thoughts to a dear friend and mentor who answered me, “Preach faith until you have it, and then because you have it, preach faith.

So, I took his advice. I continued preaching – in fields, in prisons, and in pubs. It astounded me how people came to believe in Christ, and here I was still struggling to have faith.  I cried out many nights, “Lord, help my unbelief!”

On this day, May 24, 1738, I opened my Bible at about five in the morning and came across these words, “There are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises, even that ye should partakers of the divine nature.”

Later that evening, I attended a meeting in Aldersgate. I should say, I attended quite reluctantly. I didn’t want to go! Someone was reading from Luther’s Preface to the Epistle to Romans. It was about quarter to nine while he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, that I felt my heart strangely warmed. I was felt that I did indeed trust in Christ, Christ alone for salvation; and an assurance was given me that God had taken away my sins, yes, even min, and saved me from the law of sin and death.

It would take me some time to learn how to live the life of faith, for I was always finding joy, and I thought surely I cannot be saved AND happy. I thought because I was experiencing joy that I had fallen from salvation. It took some time before I realized that it is not Christ and good works, but Christ alone who saves, resulting in good works.

Afterwards, I would ride for thousands of miles preaching the gospel to anyone who would listen.

School Lunches

In Mrs. Flakes’ first grade classroom at Rural Point Elementary, the most embarrassing  thing that could have happened happened. I was sitting in the last desk in my row. I slowly began to feel hot. As my head warmed and I began to sweat, I had an uncomfortable feeling in the bottom of my stomach. No, it wasn’t butterflies of nervousness about something that we were about to do in class. It was lunch.

I had gotten a few dollars from Dad that morning so that I could go through the cafeteria line and get pizza with my friends. Unfortunately, after lunch when we were back in the classroom, the pizza returned. I quickly turned in my seat, and like a scene from Family Guy, it seemed to not stop. I vaguely remember standing up and not knowing what direction to go. I felt awful! Mrs. Flakes tired to steer me away from the throw-up and out the classroom door to the nurse’s office. From there, my parents were called and I went home.

I made a decision that day that I held to until my senior year in high school. I would never eat cafeteria food again! From that day on Mom packed me a lunchbox (until high school when the Alf lunchbox was replaced with a brown lunch bag.)

And I still have it! My mom thinks it was Superman or Mickey Mouse before Alf.

And the lunch was always the same. There was my peanut butter and jelly sandwich on white bread. There was an off-brand ziplock bag of potato chips, a Little Debbie dessert, and a drink. Mom remembers me using the thermos that came with the lunchbox in elementary school with either milk or apple juice in it.

Even in the first grade, I was a creature of habit. I would empty the contents of my lunchbox and arrange them. When I graduated to the brown lunch bag, the drink was always in the bottom, followed by the sandwich, and the Little Debbie cake, and the chips. I would eat my peanut butter and jelly sandwich first. Then, the chips, and lastly the Little Debbie cake. And then, I would drink my drink. Why I did it this way, I have no idea. But that was my lunch routine.

When both Mom and Dad worked, I would stay at Mrs. Rice’s house. Later, when I got older, she would tell the story that whenever it was lunch time, she would ask me what I wanted, and the answer was always the same: “Peanut butter and jelly.” I image when I got older and into high school, I may have veered off that plan. But, for the most part, it was always peanut butter and jelly.

Today, whenever I’m hungry and there seems to be few options, I will make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich – either strawberry or grape. It brings me a level of comfort. It reminds me of my childhood and the security of always knowing that peanut butter and jelly would be there for me.

And the best part is, I never got sick at school again.

Follow Friday: Andrew Taylor-Troutman

I first met Andrew Taylor-Troutman in a seminary classroom. We were both students at Union-PSCE, now Union Presbyterian Seminary in Richmond, Virginia. I have this image of Andrew sitting in the chapel in Watts as I preached (if you want to call it that) during a chapel service. The Central America travel seminar group was leading worship one week, sharing about the experiences from the trip. I was sharing about our week in Costa Rica and how we experienced God.

That image of Andrew sitting in the old pew listening intently to what was being said and shared, pondering in his heart these things, has stuck with me through the years. Andrew ponders. And his pondering has led to writing beyond a blog. Andrew has two books published sharing his ponderings, Take My Hand, and most recently Parables of Parenthood. Andrew’s published works are both connected to his vocation as a pastor.

Writing Beginnings

Andrew started journaling while in college, but started writing five to six days a week while in seminary as a spiritual discipline. He says:

I used to wake up early just to write! I found that there was a great convergence between my classes, which I wanted to articulate but wasn’t really appropriate for assigned papers. So I needed to carver out some extra time.

Andrew attended a travel seminar in 2008 to Ghana. One of the requirements of the seminar was to submit a journal. While he thought what he turned in was the typical, customary musings of a seminary student, the reaction from Andrew’s professors was extraordinary. “They were extremely impressed,” he recalls, “I wasn’t really thinking about publishing then, but their support did leave an impression on me.”

After seminary, Andrew entered a graduate program at the University of Virginia. After that, he felt a call to parish ministry. During this time, serving a local church, he resumed his journaling. He was no longer writing papers for professors and it served as an outlet to process all the experiences his ministry was providing him. “Which,” Andrew says, “I might term a collision between my head and heart, my graduate study and new found relationships with laity.”

On Being Published

He goes on to say:
Re-reading my journals, I began to notice that my musings were connected with my Sunday sermons. In other words, my reflections on the events of Monday through Saturday were informing my work on Sunday in conversation with the biblical texts. This is the idea behind Take My Hand. I was fortunate that the publisher, Wipf & Stock, happened to be looking for practical theology.

Parables of Parenthood

Andrew has a new book out titled Parables of Parenthood. This began when the Wednesday morning
Bible study group at New Dublin Presbyterian asked him to teach the parables.
Andrew agreed, and he was soon intrigued by the parables contained in more than one Gospel. “In certain cases,” he states, “Matthew, Mark, and Luke received a teaching of Jesus that had been transmitted from mouth-to-mouth and recorded it in such a way as to directly address their current audience.” Because the Gospel writers were writing to different audiences, this accounts for the differences we may see in the Gospels. And in some cases, the slighter the difference, the more profound it can be.
Armed with this analysis, Andrew began to think about how the lessons he would be teaching impact his own life as a first-time father.
Parables of Parenthood is really a Bible study, written in accessible language for a wide audience, that is explained in part by anecdotes from my family life, kind of like sermon illustrations.
Andrew has shared excerpts from his new book on his blog.

On Writing

Andrew still tries to write every day, even if it is just a little. He recalls how his seminary professor Carson Brisson told hims about his older son, a collegiate swimmer, who would swim what appeared to be lazy laps over his Christmas break. When questioned by his father, the son responded that he was trying to get a “feel for the water.” “I try to do that with words,” Andrew says.
This getting a “feel for the words,” includes editing, going over and over a piece until it “sounds” or “feels” right to him. Andrew tends to write by intuition. In other words, he doesn’t know that something is inside of him until he gets it out.
The American poet Wallace Stevens is known for saying that everyone is waiting for the lightning to fall, but while you wait, wait writing. These words speak to Andrew. “Writing is a mysterious process to me,” he says, “but I am crystal-clear that it takes hard work and daily commitment.”
Andrew will be the Peakland Academy guest speaker, presenting on Parables of Parenthood at Peakland United Methodist on Monday, March 10, 2014 starting at 6pm. 
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