Jason C. Stanley

ponderings of a dad walking humbly & seeking justice

Tag: Snoopy

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (1973)

22charlie-brown-thanksgiving22-standard-printYear after year, during the week of Thanksgiving, families gather around the television to watch A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. Since it first aired on November 20, 1973, it has become as much of the holiday tradition as the turkey, the Macy’s Parade, and backyard football.

It is a welcome site when our television screens begin projecting this classic cartoon. We find comfort that Charlie Brown still doesn’t kick that football, and that Snoopy is given more responsibility than the average beagle. Comforting especially when department stores quickly replace Halloween decorations with Christmas ones; when politicians debate who should and should not be welcomed; and when saying, “Thank you,” seems to be nothing more than the reminders of a nagging parent.

In the special, Sally tells Charlie Brown that she went to the store to get a turkey tree and there was all this “Christmas stuff.” Later she laments, “I haven’t even finished eating all my Halloween candy!” (even though she was in the pumpkin patch with Linus on Halloween). We feel Sally’s pain. Before we even get to Thanksgiving, we are bombarded with Christmas music, Christmas sales, and Christmas decorations.

Has the materialism of Christmas caused a forgetting of the tradition of Thanksgiving?

Continue reading

It’s the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown (1974)

peanuts_easterbeagle6The 12th animated television special, It’s the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown, first aired on April 9, 1974 on CBS.  In this special, Charlie Brown and the gang are preparing for Easter. Peppermint Patty is teaching Marcie how to dye Easter Eggs. Poor Marcie can’t figure how to prepare the eggs to be dyed though. Sally wants new shoes for Easter Sunday. Lucy is preoccupied with getting gifts and hiding eggs.

And, then there is Linus. Linus tells them they are worried too much. None of that stuff matters, because the Easter Beagle is going to bring them Easter eggs. The Easter Beagle is right up there with the Great Pumpkin. The other children try their best to ignore or tolerant Linus’ belief in the Easter Beagle.

Like the Christmas special before it, the Easter special has a message against commercialism. As the children walk into the department store to get their Easter supplies, the store is decorated with Christmas trees and other Christmas items. Banners hang declaring how many days are left before Christmas. Sally cries out, “It’s Easter! And they have Christmas decorations out!?!”

The point is clear. Like Christmas, Easter is not about buying, buying, buying. Easter is about so much more than that. It is about the One who gave life so that we may have new life.

There has been some criticism that this special did have the religious message like its Christmas counter part. If by religious message they are referring to Linus reading from the Bible, than no, there is none of that in this one.

But there are allusions to the Gospel.

In the opening scene as Lucy listens to Schroeder play his toy piano, she talks about Easter being a time of getting gifts. Schroeder corrects her, “It’s a time of renewal,” and later, “All you think about is gimme, gimme, gimme, get, get, get.”

When the kids get to Easter Sunday, they are all sitting around waiting for something special to happen. Peppermint Patty says to Marcie, “You look forward to feeling real happy and something happens to spoil it.” Can you think of better words to describe what those who witnessed the crucifixion must have felt?

Sally is wondering where the Easter Beagle (Christ?) is. Charlie Brown expresses feelings of being alone. Sally tells Linus that he has made a fool out of her. Everyone seems to be sad or confused. Not unlike those who experienced the first Easter morning. But then in the distance a figure emerges. It is the Easter Beagle (of course, it is just Snoopy.) Snoopy dances around giving out Easter eggs that he picked up after Lucy hid them (Lucy: “He gave me my own egg!”).

Ten weeks later, the Easter experience is still hanging around. Lucy is still upset at Snoopy for pretending to be the Easter Beagle and for handing out the eggs that she hid. She goes to Snoopy with the intent of fighting him. Snoopy leans in and kisses her. She responses, “Awww, the Easter Beagle.” Even Lucy came around.

Easter BeagleThere may not have been any quoting of scripture, but there are things held in common between the first Easter and this Charlie Brown Easter. The feelings of loneliness, of being scared, confused, and uncertain all must have been feelings that the disciples and others experienced. The surprise and awe that followed when Jesus appeared. There were those like Lucy who did not believe until they experienced the grace-filled love of Christ themselves.

Lent reminds us of the tension between looking forward to being happy and the reality of loneliness and despair. The promise of Easter is the gift of resurrection; new life; renewal. In the midst of the darkness of loneliness and despair, joy comes in the morning.

A Charlie Brown Valentine (2002)

CB Valentine A Charlie Brown Valentine is the first Peanuts cartoon special that was made after the death of creator Charles Schultz. It is also the third time that such a special was made with digital ink and paint, rather than the traditional cel-hand-drawn animation (thank you, Wikipedia.) The change in animation style also refers to the way the characters are presented on screen. They are drawn in a style that is similar to way they appeared in the newspaper comic strip. For example, you may notice the annoying white line around Lucy’s head. That is to make her appear more like she does in the comic strip. But, Schultz didn’t see a need to do it in the original specials, why do it here. It is mostly a distraction, and it was never done again.

The fact that Charles Schultz was not involved in this special is evident. The animation is not nearly as good as older Peanuts specials, and the story-line leaves much to be desired. Even so, it is a Peanuts special, and it attracted over 5 million viewers when it has been aired.

The story focuses on Charlie Brown and his secret love for the little red-haired girl. They are in the same class and despite all the effort on Charlie Brown’s part, he cannot quite find the courage to talk to her. He makes a Valentine for her and hides behind a tree, hoping that she’ll walk by and take it. In the meantime, Peppermint Patty and Marcie are both are trying to get Charlie Brown’s attention, as they are both interested. But Charlie Brown is getting his sleeve caught in the pencil sharper, trying to get the little red-haired girl’s attention.

Charlie Brown’s little sister, Sally, puts all her Valentine attention on Linus. Linus, as usual, rejects that attention and love.

Sally with hands held open: I’ll just stand here until you give me a Valentine.

Linus: Or, you can stand can like for the rest of your life and never get anything.

Linus, as usual, may be on to something. Sally has it wrong, it is not about what we get, it is about what we give. Sally makes a big deal out of the Valentine box in her classroom. I couldn’t help but wonder what would we put in Jesus’ Valentine box? I would hope that we would put ourselves in there. We are the best gift we can give Jesus. The Valentine we can give to Jesus is to show love to others.

At their wall, Linus convinces Charlie Brown that he should invite the little red-haired girl to the Valentine dance. But it doesn’t quite happen, and when Charlie Brown gets enough courage to ask her to dance, she is already dancing with Snoopy.

Charlie Brown is overly love-struck in this special. He makes reference to it himself. He gets so distracted that he cannot focus on his school work or anything else. His mind is solely on the little red-haired girl.

It is a pretty standard 25-minute special. Peanuts watchers will notice that the little red-haired girl in this special looks different than she does in It’s Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown. Here, she looks a little bit like little orphan Annie.

This Peanuts special is the 34th prime-time TV special. It first aired on February 14, 2002 on ABC, the first produced by ABC and was directed by Bill Melendez.

It’s Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown

Peanuts First KissIt’s Homecoming at Charlie Brown’s school. He and Linus are on the same Homecoming float, when Charlie Brown notices the little red-headed girl. The little red-headed girl is the Homecoming Queen. Charlie Brown and Linus are two of the guys who have been selected to escort the Queen and her court onto the dance floor.

Linus explains what is expected of Charlie Brown. Tradition states that when Charlie Brown escorts the Homecoming Queen to the dance floor, he then must give her a kiss. At this, Charlie Brown can’t believe it. In fact, he is filled with so much disbelief that he falls off the Homecoming float.

During the Homecoming football game, where Charlie Brown is the team’s kicker, he is totally distracted by the little red-headed girl in the stands. And distracted by the fact that he will  have to kiss her. Each time Charlie Brown goes up to kick, Lucy pulls the ball. Even when he has the chance to be the hero and win the game, Lucy pulls the ball away from Charlie Brown. Everyone is disappointed that Charlie Brown lost the game.

But, everyone’s attention now turns to the Homecoming Dance. Charlie Brown is so nervous, he is shaking and turning red. The other boys escort the court to the dance floor, and then it is Charlie Brown’s turn. He slowly walks down the red carpet, takes the little red-headed girl’s arm, and walks her out to the dance floor. Then, he leans in and gives her a kiss.

354901

The next morning, Charlie Brown joins Linus at their wall. Linus recalls how they lost the football game the day before. And even though Charlie Brown didn’t win the game for the team, he was the hero of the dance! Poor Charlie Brown doesn’t remember any of it!

Somehow he found the courage to kiss the little red-headed girl, who in this special we learn is named Heather. Charlie Brown cannot believe that he actually did it! “What good is it to do anything, Linus, if you can’t remember what you did?” Charlie Brown inquires.

Linus just reminds him that it was still a good day because it was his first kiss. The special ends with Charlie Brown smiling in satisfaction. What a great way to end or start a day. Smiling in satisfaction. No matter what we have done, or how much of it we remember, it’s a great way to be. It’s counter to how we usually experience Charlie Brown. He can’t seem to kick that football, but he can drum up the courage to kiss the little red-headed girl.

This Peanuts cartoon is the sixteenth prime-time TV special. It first aired on October 24, 1977 on CBS and was directed by Phil Roman.

Nothing Artificial Here

linus-4There has always been something about Charlie Brown from the Peanuts comic strip that each of us can connect with. He opens his mailbox and it is always empty. He never can kick that football. He never could find the courage to talk to the little red-headed girl.

Poor, Charlie Brown.

And poor us. We all have days when no matter what we try to do, it never quite comes out right. But there are a few things we can learn from Charlie Brown. Even though that mailbox was empty, he keeps looking. Even though he never kicks that football, he keeps trying.  And even though he never could find the courage to talk to the little red-headed girl, he keeps planning to.

In 1965 A Charlie Brown Christmas aired for the first time on CBS. It has sense become a Christmas classic. In it Charlie Brown searches for the meaning of Christmas. What he sees around him does not feel like Christmas to him. “Does anybody know the meaning of Christmas?!?” he inquires.

The answer is you do, Charlie Brown. Charlie Brown is sent to choose the Christmas tree for the nativity play. The lot is filled with beautiful, sparkling, artificial trees. He chooses the only “real” tree in the lot, that happens to be the wimpiest, littlest, tree.

There is nothing artificial about Christmas or the meaning of Christmas. Charlie Brown’s decision to choose the tiniest and the weakest of the trees symbolizes how Christ chose each of us, the tiniest and the weakest.

So this Christmas season, go and love as Charlie Brown loved, never giving up and loving on the tiniest and the weakest. Go and love as Jesus has loves you.

© 2019 Jason C. Stanley

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑