Jason C. Stanley

ponderings of a dad walking humbly & seeking justice

Tag: missions (page 1 of 4)

Guest Post: A Bucket of Hope in Texas

Not long after Hurricane Harvey left a path of destruction in southeast Texas and southwest Lousiana, my colleague Rev. Joanna Dietz, an ordained deacon in the Virginia Conference, organized an Early Response Team to travel to Texas to engage in the clean-up efforts in Texas. After following her post on Facebook, I invited Joanna to write a guest post. She and her son, Andrew, blog together at Mother, Son, and … Where’s the Holy Spirit?!

It started out like any other day, watching the news and moving through my work routine. But as Harvey hit and people began calling from around the Winchester District to see what we were doing in response, I felt that tug. You know, the one that says, “You need to do something radically different here and step out in faith.” Things quickly took shape and I found myself with four other people in two cars headed down to Texas with our ERT (Early Response Team) badges, which allow us into locations that have experienced disasters.

Our first impressions were of piles of possessions on the road, hay bales that had floated across roads, and business signs ripped from their posts and scattered across parking lots and sidewalks. Some areas had remained virtually untouched beyond the occasional blue tarp on the roof, but down by the river in the poorer section of town, flooding had done severe damage to many of the homes. This is where we spent our time in Victoria, TX.

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Guest Post: UMCOR’s Sager Brown

by: Rev. Joanna Dietz

Rev. Joanna Dietz is an ordained deacon serving as the Minister of Music at St. George’s United Methodist. Here she shares about and reflects on a recent mission trip she took with church members to UMCOR’s Sager Brown.

We exited the plane, excited to be in mission. Our rental cars took us to a remote area of Louisiana, swallowed by swamps and bayous. The silence of this remote location after the cacophony sounds of our suburban life washed tranquility over our spirits – especially as we stepped out onto the gazebo over the Bayou Teche. We had safely made it to UMCOR’s (United Methodist Committee on Relief) Sager Brown Depot. This is a magical place. Here is where thousands of kits come to be checked and packed and sent out to foreign countries and places right down the street, giving hope to those whose hope has been buried in the rubble of war, poverty, natural disasters, and chaos.

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Guest Post: The Reality of Ebola in Our Lives as God’s People

The Rev. Nancy Robinson is an ordained deacon in the Virginia Conference and, along with her husband Kip, missionaries to Sierra Leone. She reflects on the reality of Ebola in our lives as God’s people in the world.

Kip and NancyKip and I, General Board of Global Ministries missionaries to Sierra Leone, are currently exiled to the United States and are asked not to return until a later date to be determined by those in leadership; Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church and leadership in Sierra Leone. We are standing in the gap, sharing the story of an amazing people and help those here in the States to understand the context and put a face on what is a concern on all of our minds.

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New York Mission: 9/11 Memorial

One of the highlights of the mission trip to New York was the expected visit to a 9/11 memorial. A highlight because I had hoped that we would get a chance to visit the 9/11 Memorial at Ground Zero.

One of the church members from Christ Community suggested and then took us to a 9/11 memorial at Breezy Point. There was a deck on the beach looking out over the bay, with a great view of the cityscape, including the Freedom Tower, filling up the lack of space left by the World Trade Centers.

Along the deck were tributes to each person from Breezy Point who was lost in the 9/11 terrorist attack. There were lined up all along the deck. It was a moving tribute to the individuals the community lost. Moving, as well, because there were so many.

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In addition there was a cross, made with beams from the World Trade Center Towers. A cross was beat, bruised, and bent. A reminder to us that in the darkest of tragedies and storms of life, there is One who has been there. One who is always with us, and One who loves us through the worst life can offer us.

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New York Mission: Day 7

Fridays on mission trips are often times the hardest. The team members are running low on energy, often due to the lack off sleep, while running high on emotions. Mission trips provide a unquine opportunity for individuals to grow closer to others, God, and themselves, all while helping others. This has most certainly been true this week.

After our quiet time/devotions and small group discussions, we loaded up and headed out to Breezy Point one last time. Some worked with Habitat for Humanity workers in finishing up Sheetrock in the winter chapel. Due to the electrical work not getting fully finished, we were not able to do the whole room in drywall, but pretty close. They also finished a layer of flooring in the winter chapel.

A handful of team members made signs about the free cook-out to post along the road, reminding people about what was happening. Others started setting up for the cook-out, which included setting games, a face painting/craft station, and of course the grill.

After lunch, small groups had a chance to walk up to the local store to get a soda or a snack. Then we headed to the beach along the bay. The group gathered in their small groups. They used this beach time to share with one another where they saw God in each other this week. This included qualities or things they did that touched them or made a difference. When the group arrived on Saturday they were given a stone and asked to keep the stone in their pocket during the week. Last night each student gave their stone to their small group leader who was to choose a name for them. The name was to symbolize who the person was from he leaders perspective. The students were to do the same for their leaders.

As the groups went around their circles sharing where they had seen God in each other, the leader shared his or her stone for each person. After this personal, spiritual, and emotional time, the team had about 20-30 minutes on the beach.

Then it was back to work. We had to finish getting ready for the cook-out and set up the stations. At about 5pm the first few people arrived, and they slowly started to come in. We had 100s of hot dogs and hamburgers, but 100s did not show up. Despite that the team had a blast spending time with those who did, especially the children. Speaking of children, we brought with us shirts and onesies decorated by children who attended Peakland’s Easter Egg Hunt back in March. One little girl put her shirt on right away and wore it the whole time. A member of Peakland made quilts for infants. We handed those out as well. One grandmother was extremely grateful to take one and share it with her new grandchild.

And the puppets! Four youth came up with three or so skits and practiced them throughout the day. Then they preformed them at different times through the evening. And they were at hit! At one point they lead the crowd that had gathered in singing “Jesus Loves Me.”

Before the cook-out was over we presented to Paul, the leader of the church, a small gift. We took a scrap piece of drywall and Linda drew a cross and flame on it, wrote the name of the church and date of the trip, and then everyone wrote a short message to them and signed their names. They hug it up in the winter chapel right away.

Paul shared that in the time following Hurricane Sandy very little work had been done at the church, and while hundreds of volunteers with Habitat for Humanity came through their church doors, very, very little work had been done on the church. Most of the volunteers came to work on homes. Paul, with some passion, expressed how more was done on and for the church in this one week than any other since Sandy.

After cleaning up the cook-out and putting it all away in the U-haul, we played a few rounds of charades in our small groups. Then we gathered in one large circle and we went around the circle sharing where we had seen God this week, it was a great time of sharing. Very moving!

We then went down the road in Breezy Point to a 9/11 memorial that was built there. A huge number of Breezy Point residents were tragically killed in the 9/11 terrorist attack. Standing there is a cross, made with two beams from the Twin Towers.

It was about 9:30tonight when we said good-bye to Breezy Point. We crossed the bridge back into Brooklyn and volunteered for cleaning duties, so that in the morning we have less to do and can roll out on time. In the morning we will spend a few hours at the Bronx Zoo before heading back to Lynchburg, brining this mission trip to an end.

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