Jason C. Stanley

ponderings of a dad walking humbly & seeking justice

Tag: Kids Can Press

Book Review: Wade’s Wiggly Antlers

Wade’s Wiggly Antlers, Louise Bradford, Kids Can Press, 2017

Wade is a young moose who enjoys playing with his friends. One day, while playing, his antlers begin to feel a little wiggly. When the wiggle doesn’t stop, Wade hurries home to his mother, who reminds him that he will loose his antlers, but new ones will grow.

Change happens.

Even though Wade and his mother had talked about the change that Wade would experience, he is still worried about it. He chooses not to play with his friends in an effort to keep his antlers. Then, once he looses them, he feels freer. He is able to do things he was not able to do before, like win at hide and seek.

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Book Review: Stop Feedin’ da Boids!

31423679Stop Feeding’ da Boids!, James Sage, Kids Can Press, 2017

Swanda is new to Brooklyn. If you have ever been to Brooklyn, you will know that it is full of diversity, thick accents, and pigeons. Lots and lots of pigeons. Swanda, a compassionate little girl, sets up some feeding stations on her fire escape to feed the birds.

And it works. The birds come!

Things get a little chaotic on the city block with all the birds. The cooing assembly leaves their mark on the sidewalks and neighbors. The reality of what is happening reveals itself in a double-page spread featuring the amazing talent of illustrator Pierre Pratt. In vibrant pastels the reader is faced with an array of birds, feathers, and round, yellow eyes against the accents of the fast-moving city life.

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Book Review: The Thing Lou Couldn’t Do

the_thing_lou_couldn_t_doThe Thing Lou Couldn’t Do, Ashley Spires, Kids Can Press, 2017.

Lou is a brave girl who is afraid of very little. She will do anything!

Well, almost anything.

When her friends choose to climb a tree, Lou isn’t so sure. She is scared and uncertain. In addition, she is concerned that her friends will think differently of her because she’s not climbing the tree.

Even though she makes up some pretty fun excuses, her friends never mock or make fun of her. Lou decides on her own to join her friends by watching them have fun. She decides to try to climb the tree.

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Book Review: Spork

SPORK COVERSpork, Kyo Maclear, Kids Can Press, 2017.

It has been a long time coming, but it has finally happened: The spork is getting its recognition.

This fun, colorful book tells the story of young Spork.  Spork’s mother is a spoon and his father is a fork. This makes Spork different from the other kids. He does not fit in with the spoons and he does not fit in with the forks.

This makes Spork sad.

It is not until an occasion arrives when a fork or a spoon will not do. There was a need for “something that was neither spoon nor fork but a bit of both.” The arrival of a baby in the house gives Spork a new-found purpose.

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Book Review: Life Without Nico

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Life Without Nico, Andrea Maturana, Kids Can Press, 2016.

Life Without Nico is another fantastic book from Kids Can Press.

Maia and Nico are best friends. They can spend hours playing together and never get bored. Then, unexpectedly, Nico and his family leave behind their South American home for the land of koalas and kangaroos.

Maia is devasted.

“Now time passes slowly, and the emptiness is with Maia everywhere she goes.”

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Book Review: The Tea Party in the Woods

theteapartyinthewoodsThe Tea Party in the Woods, Akiko Miyakoshi, Kids Can Press, 2015.

Author and illustrator Akiko Miyakoshi tells a brilliant story about a little girl named Kikko. Snow has fallen in the woods, and Kikko’s father leaves to go help her grandmother. After discovering that Father forgot the pie for Grandmother, Kikko sets out into the snow-covered woods to catch up with her father.

As she follows a set of footprints, she sees her father’s frame in the distance, and hurries to catch up to him, dropping the pie. It turns out that she was not following her father, but a well-dressed bear. At the invitation of a sheep, Kikko joins the tea party that is taking place inside the large home.

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