Jason C. Stanley

ponderings of a dad walking humbly & seeking justice

Tag: Children’s book (page 1 of 2)

Book Review: Who Counts?

Who Counts? 100 Sheep, 10 Coins, and 2 Sons, Amy-Jill Levine & Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Westminster John Knox Press, 2017.

 Fred Craddock, a New Testament scholar, refers to the three “lost” parables in Luke 15 as “Three Parables of Joy.” He writes, “The three parables of chapter 15 are a trilogy in that all three speak of the joy of finding that which was lost.”

Amy-Jill Levine, a professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School, and Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, a rabbi and Director of Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Initiative at Bulter University and Christian Theological Seminary, give readers a fresh take on the familiar parables in Luke 15 in Who Counts? These stories of Jesus are retold in modern-day settings and with modern, diverse characters.

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Giveaway: Love You Always book

Love You Always, written by Eileen Spinelli with illustrations by Gillian Flint, is the latest gift book for new babies or for Christmas. The verses are gentle and the repetition is soothing. The book aims to communicate to the child that he or she is loved – always – but a host of family members. Mostly by Mama and Daddy.

But other family members are included. Grandma, Grandpa, Auntie, and Uncle. Counsin and family friend even get a shout out. At first, this inclusion of extended family members is great. It is often rare to see Auntie and Uncle included in a children’s book. While the book seems to include a lot of the family tree, there is no inclusion of siblings or step-parents.

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Giveaway: Daddy’s Girl children’s book

Daddy’s Girl is a new picture book from author Helen Foster James and illustrator Estelle Corke great for children ages 2-5.  Jame’s rhymes make the story of a little girl preparing her tea party approachable for young ears. Corke’s illustrations make use of pink and yellow as the primary colors, ensuring that each page is bright and colorful.

As the little girl, whose accessorizing includes a crown, pearls, and a boa, has tea with her teddy bear and Daddy, she realizes she has more than enough to share with others. She invites other stuffed animals to the tea party.  The story concludes with a father and daughter hug, as the daughter expresses, “I love that you are here.”

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Giveaway: Charlie the Tramp 50th Anniversary

charliethetrampRussel Hoban has written some of the best classics in children’s literature. Bread and Jam for Frances and Bedtime for Frances are two of the most loved.

In 1966, Hoban wrote Charlie the Tramp, illustrated by his wife Lillian Hoban. Charlie is a young beaver who wants to grow up to be a tramp. His parents, much to the dismay of Charlie’s grandfather, allow him to experience the life of a homeless beaver. During this experience, Charlie hears, like young Samuel in the night, the call to his life’s work.

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Book Review: Miss You Like Crazy

51lziec6oclMiss You Like Crazy, Pamela Hall, Tanglewood Press, 2014.

Walnut is a little squirrel who is going to miss his mom when she goes to work. They agree that it would be a lot of fun if he could go to work with her. They imagine the adventures they could share. Even though they cannot have these adventures all the time, Walnut’s mother assures him that he is always on her mind. Together they find ways to have a presence for each other when at work or school.

The story is light-hearted and fun. The illustrations are cheerful and eye catching. Toddler J enjoyed hearing the story, but I think she might have enjoyed the pictures of the squirrel family more.

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Book Review: Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education

MalalaMalala: Activist for Girls’ Education, Raphaele Frier, Charlesbridge, 2017.

In October of 2012, Malala Yousafzai was tossed into the mainstream media after the Taliban attempted to take her life. Malala was targeted because he was a girl receiving an education. Her father was targeted because he not only allowed her to get an education, he ran the school for girls.

After recovering from her injuries, Malala became a force to be reckoned with. She used her young voice to advocate for girls’ education. At the age of eighteen, she became the youngest person awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

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Book Review: You Are Two

YouAreTwo_cover_v2_150901.inddYou Are Two, Sara O’Leary, Owlkids Books, 2016. 

At our house, we are inching closer with each passing day to 2-year-old status. This stage of life is most often referred to as the “terrible twos.” The days are filled with the struggle of telling a toddler “No,” while the toddler continues to do it. Or, brief, random moments of fussy and kicking when the toddler does not get what they want. Then, there is the constant refrain, “Mine.”

The twos can be quite terrible.

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Book Review: Max at Night

max-at-nightMax at Night, Ed Vere, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, 2016.

Max at Night will remind you of Good Night, Moon. No doubt, it will become apart of the nighttime ritual for little ones.  In Ed Vere’s latest children’s book, Max, the brave little kitten, is ready for bed. The little kitten, however, cannot go to sleep until he says goodnight to the moon.

When he looks out the window, the moon is not there. His nighttime ritual is incomplete, and Max is unable to go to sleep.

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Book Review: Monkeys & Crocodiles Play Baseball

Baseball_coverMonkeys and Crocodiles Play Baseball, Angel Krishna, Global Publishing Group, 2015.

This is a fun, little book for children about a group of monkeys who are playing baseball. It’s what they do every Sunday afternoon. But one Sunday there were no coconuts to be found. They couldn’t play baseball without a coconut to use as their ball.

The only solution to their dilemma is to go to the other side of the island to get more coconuts, which means crossing the river. But they cannot cross the river with help from the crocodiles. The crocodiles see the monkeys coming and know that they are going to ask for help to get across the river. Continue reading

Book Review: I Can Roar!

cover72793-mediumI Can Roar!, Frank Asch, Kids Can Press, 2015.

In this combination of two previous Asch books from 1997 I Can Blink Like an Owl and I Can Roar Like a Lion, children have the opportunity to pretend to be many different animals by putting their faces up to the cut-out hole at the center of the board book.

This is a great little board book for children ages 2-4. It’s a great way for them to learn different animals and be creative. For example, one page says, “I can baa like a sheep,” and another, “I can puff my cheeks like a squirrel.”

Here’s a preview video so you can get the idea:

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