I took a break from my Follow Friday posts during the season of Lent  . . . .  and then some. I return today with the blog of a dear friend of mine, Sarah Wastella’s She Offered Them Christ. Sarah is a provisional elder in the United Methodist Church and says that the name of her blog comes from John Wesley’s charge to “offer them Christ,” which Sarah takes seriously. “Christ is the center of my ministry,” she says, “and I chose to de-emphasize my name by referring to myself only in pronoun. I would be pleased to know that my legacy will not be about me, but the things I did for Christ, to honor the Lord, and further the mission to make disciples.”

And She Offered Them Christ is very much about making disciples. Even if it was an accidental creation. Sarah explains:

In February 2011, I was given the website as a gift, a place to put my sermons online. At that time I was preaching less than once a month, and I had other products of my theological reflections, which I refer to as ponderings, that I started to post. It was never my intention to start an online ministry or have a daily post presence. That grew over time as people started to tell me that they use my posts for their daily devotions. That really rocked my world; it humbled me, but also challenged me to continue to provide new content for consideration and for growth.

A large part of Sarah’s blog is devotional material. She says that after posting daily for a few months, she missed a day or two, and people noticed. As she stated above, it is challenging to provide new content on a regular basis. For Sarah, her devotionals, such as “Praying for our Enemies, Bullies, and Opponents,” cite a specific passage, a brief meditation on that passage, followed by a prayer. The formula works well. “I tend to write devotionals,” she said, “when I come across a passage that really strikes me, or when I have an insight about it that might be impactful for someone else.”

devotions_3687cThese ponderings are the result of Sarah’s own theological reflections. At times they may come from experiences in pastoral ministry or from personal events, “such as raising a young child, or struggling with disappointment,” Sarah says. On Sundays, she tends to post prayers. Her regular Sunday morning responsibilities in worship include prayer, and she may from time to time post that prayer that was offered in worship on her blog. The prayers have a connection with the liturgical calendar and/or events of the day.

It is without doubt that Sarah’s posts, devotional, prayer, or otherwise, come from a place of prayer. “All my posts result from prayer and Scripture reading,” she says. “I feel the presence and the movement of the Holy Spirit in what I write, and I hope that others do too.”

In the midst of prayers and devotionals, Sarah occasionally writes about church polity. When she does, like in a recent post “Breaking Discipline: Accident or Willful Disobedience?”, Sarah does not join a team. She raises her own voice, which is not unlike the voice in the desert, calling for each “team” to see or hear the other perspective. She is not concerned with stirring people up, as much as she is concerned with encouraging the people of God to see another way in which Christ calls us to think, reason, reflect, speak, feel, or act. Sarah tends to ask us to consider our mission as the Church in the current debate, and how we will faithfully respond. This is what she says about that:

I write about church polity when I feel that I may have an alternative way of looking at it, or articulating it. I do not think we need one more voice on this side or that side of whatever hot button issue is going on right now. Usually I feel the urge when I find myself inundated with it online and through social media. I do not comment on everything, because I do not have something of use to say on everything.

Sarah admits that when she writes such a post about church polity, it is a little uncomfortable. “Those are the posts,” she says, “that make me hold my breath and wait to see what the response will be.” Sarah does not write about church politics very often because she feels like her pastoral voice would get lost in the politics.

I think that if I spent all my time posting about politics of the church or the secular world that people would start to ignore the things I have to say about the rest of our lives. I can turn people off, and I want Christ to get us excited to mature in our faith. When I do post about those topics, it seems to be more impactful because it means that I really have something I felt I needed to say, rather than just my constant reaction. I think I say things that others think but do not say, or struggle to articulate. I do not want people to blindly agree with me either, but consider what is being presented, what Christ might have to say to illuminate it, and draw their own conclusion after theologically reflecting on all sides.

It is statements like that, that it is obvious that Sarah’s blog is a tool of discipleship. Sarah says, “My writings tend to be less evangelical, and more about pushing us to go deeper in our spirituality, looking at things from a different vantage point, but still well within the lens of Christ.”  Because that is the case, Sarah is careful not to be a stumbling block to her readers. While some of her church members read her blog, she doesn’t write solely for them. “I do not write for my church members,” she says, “although some of them have discovered it and follow it.” She goes on to say, “I see this as a wider ministry to the greater Christian community.”

As a blogger, I am always interested in other bloggers’ writing process. Sarah tells me that she typically writes in the evenings, “when things calm down in my household.” Sarah takes time to think about what is impacting her and what struggles she is going through, or the struggles that she sees around her. “Some of my most well received posts have been reflections about traumatic events in the community, such as a rash of suicides and violence,” she says.

Sarah composes a post – a prayer, pondering or devotional – and then lets it sit. She comes back to it later to make sure she still feels called to share it before she publishes it on her blog. “No matter what you read on my site,” she says, ” rest assured it was created and shared in concert with a lot of prayer and Bible.”

Read more at www.sheofferedthemchrist.com. You can follow Sarah on Twitter at @SarahWastella.