Jason C. Stanley

ponderings of a deacon dad walking humbly & seeking justice

Category: Kids Books (page 1 of 6)

Book Review: Wade’s Wiggly Antlers

Wade’s Wiggly Antlers, Louise Bradford, Kids Can Press, 2017

Wade is a young moose who enjoys playing with his friends. One day, while playing, his antlers begin to feel a little wiggly. When the wiggle doesn’t stop, Wade hurries home to his mother, who reminds him that he will loose his antlers, but new ones will grow.

Change happens.

Even though Wade and his mother had talked about the change that Wade would experience, he is still worried about it. He chooses not to play with his friends in an effort to keep his antlers. Then, once he looses them, he feels freer. He is able to do things he was not able to do before, like win at hide and seek.

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Book Review: Stop Feedin’ da Boids!

31423679Stop Feeding’ da Boids!, James Sage, Kids Can Press, 2017

Swanda is new to Brooklyn. If you have ever been to Brooklyn, you will know that it is full of diversity, thick accents, and pigeons. Lots and lots of pigeons. Swanda, a compassionate little girl, sets up some feeding stations on her fire escape to feed the birds.

And it works. The birds come!

Things get a little chaotic on the city block with all the birds. The cooing assembly leaves their mark on the sidewalks and neighbors. The reality of what is happening reveals itself in a double-page spread featuring the amazing talent of illustrator Pierre Pratt. In vibrant pastels the reader is faced with an array of birds, feathers, and round, yellow eyes against the accents of the fast-moving city life.

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Book Review: The Thing Lou Couldn’t Do

the_thing_lou_couldn_t_doThe Thing Lou Couldn’t Do, Ashley Spires, Kids Can Press, 2017.

Lou is a brave girl who is afraid of very little. She will do anything!

Well, almost anything.

When her friends choose to climb a tree, Lou isn’t so sure. She is scared and uncertain. In addition, she is concerned that her friends will think differently of her because she’s not climbing the tree.

Even though she makes up some pretty fun excuses, her friends never mock or make fun of her. Lou decides on her own to join her friends by watching them have fun. She decides to try to climb the tree.

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Book Review: Spork

SPORK COVERSpork, Kyo Maclear, Kids Can Press, 2017.

It has been a long time coming, but it has finally happened: The spork is getting its recognition.

This fun, colorful book tells the story of young Spork.  Spork’s mother is a spoon and his father is a fork. This makes Spork different from the other kids. He does not fit in with the spoons and he does not fit in with the forks.

This makes Spork sad.

It is not until an occasion arrives when a fork or a spoon will not do. There was a need for “something that was neither spoon nor fork but a bit of both.” The arrival of a baby in the house gives Spork a new-found purpose.

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Book Review: Good Morning Superman

stl032233Good Morning Superman, Michael Dahl, Capstone Young Readers, 2017.

The sun rises, bringing with it a new day in the city of Metropolis. With the rising of the sun, Clark Kent transforms into Superman. At our house, a toddler wakes up ready to conquer the day. But before she can leave the house, there are a number of things to do to get ready.

From the creative mind of Michael Dahl, comes another superhero themed children’s book. Similar to his book Bedtime for Batman, Good Morning Superman parallels Clark Kent getting ready for the day with an unnamed African-American boy getting ready for the day.

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Giveaway: Charlie the Tramp 50th Anniversary

charliethetrampRussel Hoban has written some of the best classics in children’s literature. Bread and Jam for Frances and Bedtime for Frances are two of the most loved.

In 1966, Hoban wrote Charlie the Tramp, illustrated by his wife Lillian Hoban. Charlie is a young beaver who wants to grow up to be a tramp. His parents, much to the dismay of Charlie’s grandfather, allow him to experience the life of a homeless beaver. During this experience, Charlie hears, like young Samuel in the night, the call to his life’s work.

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Book Review: Miss You Like Crazy

51lziec6oclMiss You Like Crazy, Pamela Hall, Tanglewood Press, 2014.

Walnut is a little squirrel who is going to miss his mom when she goes to work. They agree that it would be a lot of fun if he could go to work with her. They imagine the adventures they could share. Even though they cannot have these adventures all the time, Walnut’s mother assures him that he is always on her mind. Together they find ways to have a presence for each other when at work or school.

The story is light-hearted and fun. The illustrations are cheerful and eye catching. Toddler J enjoyed hearing the story, but I think she might have enjoyed the pictures of the squirrel family more.

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Book Review: The Littlest Star

31626855The Littlest Star, Richard Littledale, Lion Hudson Plc, 2016.

Have you ever wondered how many stars there are in the great, big sky?

Richard Littledale’s book, The Littlest Star, is the story about the littlest of all the stars. This particular star was not as sparkly or exciting as the other stars, but on one holy night, it had the biggest, most important job of all.

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Book Review: Malala: Activist for Girls’ Education

MalalaMalala: Activist for Girls’ Education, Raphaele Frier, Charlesbridge, 2017.

In October of 2012, Malala Yousafzai was tossed into the mainstream media after the Taliban attempted to take her life. Malala was targeted because he was a girl receiving an education. Her father was targeted because he not only allowed her to get an education, he ran the school for girls.

After recovering from her injuries, Malala became a force to be reckoned with. She used her young voice to advocate for girls’ education. At the age of eighteen, she became the youngest person awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

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Book Review: Abigail the Whale

b1803a34179601-570f036a91e42Abigail the Whale, Davide Cali, Owlkids Books, 2016.

The title aside, I had hopes that this book for readers ages 6-8 would help reverse the body shaming of young girls. Abigail is a heavyset white girl on the swim team. As the book opens, she walks towards a group of jeering, thin white girls. They are making fun of her weight. The coach, a large, white male, does nothing to silence the bullying. He only tells Abigail, “if you want to feel like, think light.”

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